Global Immunization Policy

Contemporary Global Health Governance: Origins, Functions, and Challenges
Taking the global immunization policy, look at the Systems Model on the policy process, Figure 1.3 (see the attached files) (Problem Identification, Policy Formulation, Policy Implementation, Policy Evaluation) on page 36 in your textbook. Write a paper with the purpose of overcoming the problems described by the four Rs (Reaction, Repetition, Results, and Raising Funds) on page 57.
Assume the role of the leader who will be building a coalition by creating a policy vision for the internal and external stakeholders of your geographical area or country.
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First, begin by identifying the deficiencies in a global policy that you have researched so that you can establish a policy vision by determining the needed funding for the services you feel must be provided and including that in the policy.
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Explain how your policy would benefit your target population. Include the following headings/sections in your submission:
Introduction—Describe      the population affected by the policy
Deficiencies      of—Name of Global Policy
Vision of      Changes—Needed what needs to change to make the policy better
Gaining      Support for the Vision—Internal and external
Needed      Funding—Where will funding come from for services discussed in the policy
Conclusions
References

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Management Team Decision Peer Review for Confl ict Resolution Your troubles began when the… Posted…

Management Team Decision
Peer Review for Confl ict Resolution Your troubles began when the teenage clerk at one of your convenience stores wrestled a gun away from a would-be robber. On hearing the story, your friends said, “How brave!” and “Did you give him an award?” but you and the other managers in the company all had a very different reaction. You know you will have to fi re the employee for violating a long-standing and well-known company policy against heroism. Convenience store robberies are a common occurrence, and if your (mostly young) workers, manning dozens of stores, begin to attempt behind-the-counter vigilantism, you will have a serious problem on your hands. Despite the unanimous mind-set of your management team, you realize that fi ring the employee outright may create negative fallout among the other employees. At least one employee in particular is likely to vocally protest the fi ring. As you sit with your team trying to decide how to resolve this issue, one of your managers proposes implementing a peer review process at the company. A panel of employees would be responsible for arbitrating disputes and resolving any disagreements between how managers enforce the rules and how employees experience those rules being enforced. Advocates trumpet the benefits of peer review systems. Peer reviews are practical and cost-effective, particularly compared with formal legal arbitration, and they allow disputes to be resolved internally. Because peer reviews give employees some say in the outcome of disputes, the employees are more likely to find the decisions credible and acceptable. Many managers also like peer reviews because they help to avert the backlash that a manager may experience for unilaterally disciplining an employee who has violated company rules. Detractors, however, say that peer reviews may give employees too much control over the management decision process. Review panels effectively diffuse the decision-making function throughout the organization in a way that is counter to the centralized decision making of traditionally structured companies. In addition, creating and maintaining peer review systems requires a commitment of time and resources. Employees lose work hours (and thus productivity) when they participate on panels. And management should consult with a knowledgeable attorney to make sure that review panel procedures conform to National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) dictates about work teams. The process must be shared with all employees, who also must be trained in the process. And what will you do if employees reverse a management decision? Nonetheless, the number of companies using peer review systems is increasing as their popularity grows. One consultant alone has over 500 companies, including Kodak, Hooters, Marriott, and Red Lobster, using his peer review process. For this exercise, assemble a team of five students to act as the management team for the convenience store chain in this scenario.
Questions
1. Which historical management theory gives the best justification for implementing peer review systems? Which theory would not support peer reviews?
2. Do you implement a peer review process in the convenience store scenario? Explain your decision.
3. Regardless of your answer in question 2, as a team draw up guidelines for a peer review process. What would you need to consider if you were to create a review panel? For example, do you need to set restrictions on the ratio of employees to managers on the panel—will there even be managers on the panel? How many years of service should an employee have to participate? Should the panel include a mix of employees from different departments?
4. Now, following the guidelines you established in question 3, imagine that your team is the review panel for the convenience store clerk who foiled a robbery. Discuss the situation and come to a decision regarding the outcome. Do you fi re the employee, warn the employee, or commend his actions?

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Develop your Career Potential Know Where Management Is Going As you read in the chapter,… Posted 7…

Develop your Career Potential
Know Where Management Is Going As you read in the chapter, management theories are dynamic. In other words, they change over time, sometimes very rapidly. In addition, management theories have often been cumulative, meaning that later theorists tend to build on theories previously advanced by other scholars. Thus, a new theory becomes the starting point for yet another theory that can either refi ne or refute the management thinking of the day. One way to prepare for your career as a manager is by becoming aware of management trends today. The best (and easiest) way to do that is by regularly combing through business newspapers and periodicals. You will always fi nd at least one article that relates to management concepts, and as you scan the business press over time, you will see which theories are influencing current management thinking the most. By understanding management history and management today, you will be better able to anticipate changes to management ideas in the future. This exercise is designed to introduce you to the business press and to help you make the connection between the concepts you learn in the classroom and real-world management activities. Done regularly, it will provide you with invaluable insights into business activities at all types of organizations around the world.
Activities
1. Find a current article of substance in the business press (for example, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, Fortune, BusinessWeek, Inc.) that discusses topics covered in this course. Although this is only Chapter 2, you will be surprised by the amount of terminology you have already learned. If you are having trouble finding an article, read through the table of contents on pages v–viii to familiarize yourself with the names of concepts that will be presented later in the term. Read your article carefully, making notes about relevant content.
2. Write a one-paragraph summary of the key points in your article. List the terms or concepts critical to understanding the article, and provide definitions of those terms. If you are unfamiliar with a term or concept that is central to the article, do some research in your textbook or see your professor during office hours. Relate these key points to the concepts in your text by citing page numbers.
3. How does your article relate to the management theories covered in this chapter? Explain the situation detailed in your article in terms of the history of management.

Jan 29 2018 08:40 AM

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Practice Being A Manager Observing History Today The topic of management history may sound like……

Practice Being A Manager
Observing History Today
The topic of management history may sound like old news, but many of the issues and problems addressed by Max Weber, Chester Barnard, and other management theorists still challenge managers today. How can we structure an organization for maximum efficiency and just treatment of individuals? What is the basis for, and limits to, authority in organizations? It is rather amazing that these thinkers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries generated such a wealth of theory that still influences our discussion of management and leadership challenges in the 21st century. This exercise will give you the opportunity to draw upon some ideas that trace their roots back to the pioneers of management thinking.
Preparing in Advance for Class Discussion
Step 1: Find an observation point. Identify a place where you can unobtrusively observe a group of people as they go about their work. You might select a coffee shop, bookstore, or restaurant.
Step 2: Settle in and observe. Go to your selected workplace and observe the people working there for at least 20 minutes. You should take along something like a notebook or PDA so that you can jot down a few notes. It is a good idea to go during a busy time, so long as it is not so crowded that you will be unable to easily observe the workers. Step 3: Observe employees at work. Observe the process of work and the interaction among the employees. Consider some of the following issues:
• Identify the steps that employees follow in completing a work cycle (e.g., from taking an order to delivering a product). Can you see improvements that might be made, particularly steps that might be eliminated or streamlined?
• Observe the interaction and mood of the workers. Are they stressed? Or are they more relaxed? Does it seem to you that these workers like working with each other?
• Listen for signs of conflict. If you see signs of conflict, is the conflict resolved? If so, how did the workers resolve their conflict? If not, do you think that these workers suppress (bottle up) conflict?
• Can you tell who is in charge here? If so, how do the other workers respond to this person’s directions? If not, how does the work group sort out who should be doing each task, and in what order?
Step 4: Consider what you saw. Immediately after your observation session, look through this chapter on management history for connections to your observations. For example, do you see any signs of the “Hawthorne Effect”? Would Frederick Taylor approve of the work process you observed, or might he have suggested improvements? What might Chester Barnard’s theory have to say about how the workers you observed responded to instructions from their “boss”? Write a one-page paper of bullet-point notes describing possible connections between your observations and the thinking of management pioneers such as Mary Parker Follett.
Class Discussion
Step 5: Share your findings as a class. Discuss the various points of connection that you found between pioneering management thinkers and your own observations of people at work. Are some of the issues of management “timeless”? If so, what do you see as timeless issues of management? What are some ways in which work and management have changed since the days of the management pioneers?

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Management Decision Scripted Service It has been two years since you took over your family’s……

Management Decision
Scripted Service It has been two years since you took over your family’s chain of specialty neighborhood bakeries located in areas with high foot traffic.82 Through-out the city, your stores are the choice for birthday cakes, Christmas cookies, Valentine’s Day cupcakes, and the daily doughnut. Even though sales are steady, you want to grow and are having a difficult time figuring out exactly how to increase revenues. For the past three weeks, you have spent each day in a different store, stocking cases, slicing bread, and generally pitching in where needed, but mostly you have been observing. As luck would have it, about 80 percent of your stores are located near or next to a Starbucks. On your way to the stores each morning, you have stopped to get your morning coffee, and at each Starbucks, you have been greeted quickly, chatted with the clerk, ordered, heard your order repeated across the bar, used a loaded Starbucks card to pay, been asked if you want your balance, and been told to have a nice day. Today is the same. As you wait for your coffee, you think about the contrast between this prescribed sequence and what you have been seeing in your own stores. Even though your clerks serve customers efficiently, they do so in various ways. Some clerks are outgoing, talking and laughing with the customer while assembling the order. Other clerks are more reserved, filling the order quickly but with little conversation and barely a smile. Now that you have noticed these differences, everywhere you shop you’ve been paying attention to sales speech patterns, which appear scripted and repetitive but pleasantly predictable. From the grocery (“Do you have any coupons?” and “Paper or plastic?”) to the fast-food restaurant (“Do you want fries with that?” and “For here or to go?”), the patterns are most noticeable during busy periods. Clerks follow the same speech sequence with every customer. A little research reveals that numerous companies require employees to follow a script. At McDonald’s, the script is concerned with speech: for example, workers must say “May I help you, ma’am?” instead of “Can I help someone?” At Olive Garden, the script adds actions to the words: greet the table within 30 seconds of sit-down; take the drink order within three minutes; during ordering, suggest fi ve items (drink, side dish, dessert, specials, and special offers); after food arrives, check back within three minutes. At Starbucks, things are more relaxed, but there is still a script to guide employee interactions with customers looking for a latte. After a week of observing these scripted encounters, you begin to wonder if you should write a sales script for your bakery staff. If interactions were standardized, you might be able to increase efficiency and sales revenue. A script might be a great help during the morning and the after-school rush, as well as a useful training tool for new hires; it might help them feel more confident behind the counter. Since you want to grow, a script could also help you get up and running faster in new locations. But how would your current employees feel about it? They all have different ways of working with customers. About half of them have been with you or many years and know the ropes already. And how would your customers respond? The bakery could lose some of its neighborly appeal when customers recognize the canned speech. You hear the barista call out, “Triple-shot venti extra hot latte,” so you go collect your coffee. She looks you right in the eye, smiles, and says, “Have a nice day!”
Questions
1. Which historical management technique best describes scripted service speech and scripted employee behavior? Explain your choice.
2. Do you implement a customer-encounter script at your bakeries? Why or why not?
3. Imagine that you have decided to implement a script for your frontline employees. Write the service script for bakery clerks.

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BALANCED SCORECARDS AT BIOCO BIOCO is a profitable and growing medium-sized bio-pharmaceutical……

BALANCED SCORECARDS AT BIOCO
BIOCO is a profitable and growing medium-sized bio-pharmaceutical company located in the southeast United States. It develops, produces and markets vaccines and antibody-based pharmaceutical products. As part of the company’s strategic transformation, BIOCO’s CEO introduced a top-down, strategy-driven management process called the “BIOCO Way.” The CEO has a strong conviction that the success of a company starts with a clear vision of what the company wants to be and a corporate strategy that reflects that vision. In the BIOCO Way, the corporate vision and strategy are translated into a long-term corporate strategic plan, which in turn is used to generate the corporate strategy map. To measure progress against the strategy map a cascade of balanced scorecards (corporate, division/department) are developed and used. As a result of the full integration of the levels of balanced scorecards into the planning process, the BIOCO Way emphasizes how the strategies and related tactics should be carried out and measured at all levels. The CEO is a strong champion of the balanced scorecards and is considered an in-house guru for the method. Each year, BIOCO managers at the corporate and department levels review performance and assess the appropriateness of their respective balanced scorecards for the prior year. Based on the results of the performance reviews and a short-term execution plan for the upcoming year, strategic initiatives are added, modified or removed and the metrics in the scorecards are adjusted accordingly. The CIO thinks that the balanced scorecards help the departments look beyond their own operations and the Vice President thinks they mobilize everyone in the company by setting up tangible goals that are clearly linked to the overall goals of the company. The CIO thinks it enhances communications because it “provides a focal point and common language around the key value drivers of the organization” and it helps IT understand other business areas.
Discussion Questions
1. What benefits has BIOCO realized from its use of balanced scorecards?
2. Do you think the BIOCO way was useful in helping the IT department align its goals with that of the company? Why or why not?
3. Do you think that the BIOCO approach could be implemented successfully in large companies? Why or why not? If so, what, if any, adjustments need to be made?
4. BIOCO recently was sold and now has a new CEO. Do you think the BIOCO way will be as successful under the new CEO? Why or why not?

Jan 29 2018 08:40 AM

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The Traditional Competitive Module in Healthcare

In a truly competitive marketplace, a healthcare organization must assess what  its competitors are charging for services that organization offers. If  it charges too much, other healthcare organizations simply will not conduct  business with it. If it charges too little, the profit margins are  non-existent and the healthcare organization would fail to make a profit. In this discussion, describe the best ways for a healthcare organization to  understand pricing within its scope of services. Are the methods that  you chose ethical? Why or why not? Would they be ethical in other  countries or cultures?
2 pages do not include the cover or references
Provide support for your statements with in-text citations from a  minimum of six scholarly articles. Two of these sources may be from the  class readings, textbook, or lectures, but four must be external.
Provide full APA citations for articles under review.

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